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Project NameProgram Name TypeRIN CategoryFindingsMethodLocation/ AddressLatitudeLongitudeCitationKey Words/ThemesWant to Learn More? Click the dot.Learn More 2
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"Crafting Mass Dairy Production"LiteratureEconomyThe manager-employee relationship needs special attention in rural dairy farms for stable profits, dairy production, and migrant workforce. Not only do animals benefit from a long-term relationship between a manager and an immigrant employee, as opposed to a temporary work position, but immigrant workers gain stable financial status important in community prosperity. 22 months of ethnographic research and formal interviews from three competing farms in a rural town in Kansas.KS, U.S.39.111564-94.58314Garni, Alisa. 2018. “Crafting Mass Dairy Production: Immigration and Community in Rural America.” Rural Sociology 83 (2): 244–69. doi:10.1111/ruso.12169.
Farmers; Farm Management; Dairies; Global Marketing; Labor; Employees
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"In Rural Towns, Immigrant Doctors Fill A Critical Need"LiteratureEconomyAnti-Muslim sentiment and the Travel Ban negatively affect immigrant doctors. Immigrant doctors help rural towns in the U.S. alleviate the shortage in the professional health care workforce, but are inhibited from doing so from anti-Muslim national policies. Analysis from Immigrant Doctors ProjectU.S. Rust Belt - Northeastern and Midwestern U.S.41.611592-81.447089Harker, Yasmin Sokkar. 2018. “In Rural Towns, Immigrant Doctors Fill A Critical Need.” Health Affairs 37 (1): 161–64. doi:10.1377/hlthaff.2017.1094.
Foreign Medical Graduates; Medically Underserved Area; Physicians Supply & Distribution; Rural Population
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"Culture, Context, or Conflict?" LiteratureEconomyConservative cultural attitudes do not significantly affect a worker's attitude towards a union. Job dissatisfaction and management retaliation worries or efforts significantly affect a worker's attitude towards a union. These findings give insight to the dynamics of rural workplaces in Right-to-Work statesComparative study of six rural counties in conservative right-to-work statesNorthern UT, U.S.40.462612-111.770679Jacobs, Paul, and Christy Glass. 2015. “Culture, Context, or Conflict? Analyzing Union Attitudes in Six Rural Counties in Conservative Right-to-Work States.” Rural Sociology 80 (4): 512–36. doi:10.1111/ruso.12084.Right-to-work States; Conservative; Labor Union; Rural
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"Culture, Context, or Conflict?". LiteratureEconomyConservative cultural attitudes do not significantly affect a worker's attitude towards a union. Job dissatisfaction and management retaliation worries or efforts significantly affect a worker's attitude towards a union. These findings give insight to the dynamics of rural workplaces in Right-to-Work states. Comparative study of six rural counties in conservative right-to-work statesSouthern ID, U.S.42.859503-113.931756Jacobs, Paul, and Christy Glass. 2015. “Culture, Context, or Conflict? Analyzing Union Attitudes in Six Rural Counties in Conservative Right-to-Work States.” Rural Sociology 80 (4): 512–36. doi:10.1111/ruso.12084.Right-to-work States; Conservative; Labor Union; Rural
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"The Effects of Homeownership on Civic Participation among Immigrant Farmworkers in Washington State" LiteratureEconomyHomeowning immigrant farmworkers have higher involvement in the community than renters. Homeownership facillitates adaptation, or social integration, of immigrant farmworkers in their communities Inferential statistics used to analyze Washington State Farmworker Survey dataWhatcom, Skagit, Snohomish, Okanagan, Chelan, Douglas, Grant, Adams, Franklin, Benton, Walla Walla, Yakima, Lewis, and Clark County, WA46.621154-119.15961Mireles, Gilbert F. 2016. “The Effects of Homeownership on Civic Participation among Immigrant Farmworkers in Washington State.” Rural Sociology 82 (1): 129–48. doi:10.1111/ruso.12118.
Immigrant Farmworkers; Housing; Rural Areas; Immigrant Adaptation
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"Latinos Living Well- A Diabetes Education Program for Rural-Residing Latinos"LiteratureHealthLatinos Living Well (LLW) represents an opportunity for Extension to impact the Latino population through diabetes self-management education. LLW delivery is best done through collaborations with Latino-serving community partners.Descriptive statistics and sample t-tests.Ames, IA42.02623-93.64859Keane, Michelle N, and Sarah L Francis. 2018. “Latinos Living Well- A Diabetes Education Program for Rural-Residing Latinos.” Journal of Extension 56 (4): 1–13. https://joe.org/joe/2018august/pdf/JOE_v56_4rb1.pdf.
Diabetes Education; Diabetes Self-management; Latinos; Rural; Self-efficacy
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"Predictors for Using a HIV Self-Test Among Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in North Carolina"LiteratureHealthMigrant and seasonal farmworkers (MSF) with more knowledge of HIV transmission and prevention were more willing to express the intent to use HIV home test kits than those with less knowledge. Concern among MSF of HIV transmission as a somewhat or very serious issue in their community is associated with communicating the intent to use a HIV home test kit.A self-administered survey of migrant farmers across 19 migrant camps on knowledge related to HIV.Kinston, NC35.26327-77.5816Kinney, Samantha, C. Lea, Greg Kearney, Anna Kinsey, and Carlos Amaya. 2015. “Predictors for Using a HIV Self-Test Among Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in North Carolina.” International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 12 (7): 8348–58. doi:10.3390/ijerph120708348.
HIV Testing; Seasonal and Migrant Farmworkers; Behavioral Factors; Survey;
North Carolina
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"Musculoskeletal Healthcare for Latino Migrant Farmworkers: Interprofessional Collaboration to Provide Service and Educate Future Health Care Providers"LiteratureHealthCollaboration between community health nurses and a university physical therapy team has benefitted migrant workers with musculoskeletal services. Researchers at Pacific Univeristy found that these services both diminish the risk of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) and improve musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS).Report of collaboration between health care providers and volunteer health care professionals from Pacific University.Hillsboro, OR45.523949-122.989738Brumitt, Jason, Leda I Garside, Rebecca Reisch, Talina Marshall, Hui En Gilpin, Jessica Kinsey, and Kelsey Imondi. 2011. “Musculoskeletal Healthcare for Latino Migrant Farmworkers: Interprofessional Collaboration to Provide Service and Educate Future Healthcare Providers.” Health and Interprofessional Practice 1 (1): 1–9. doi:10.7772/2159-1253.1006.
Musculoskeletal Health; Physical Therapy; Health Care Inequities; Access; Community Collaboration
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"Immigration, Racial Hierarchies, and Intergroup Relations Efforts in the United States"LiteratureCulture & LanguageOrganizations attempt to build bridges between immigrants and other discriminated minorities in order to promote interpersonal connections. Some of the limitations can be staying within n immigrant-centric relationship-building mode, rather than conversing about Black, White, and other racial catagories to find common causes or values. Group interviews with community members who implemented integration/coalition workshops.MS, U.S.32.3547-89.3985Stuesse, Angela, Cheryl Staats, and Andrew Grant-Thomas. 2017. “As Others Pluck Fruit Off The Tree Of Opportunity: Immigration, Racial Hierarchies, and Intergroup Relations Efforts in the United States.” Du Bois Review: Social Science Research on Race 14 (1): 245–71. doi:10.1017/s1742058x16000394.
Coalition-building; Intergroup Relations Efforts; Storytelling; Dialogue
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"Undocumented Immigrants and Higher Education Policy: The Policymaking Environment of New York State"LiteraturePolicy & Public ServicesThe study identifies political actors forming New York State's postsecondary education policies for undocumented students and DACA beneficiaries. New York State has failed to enact comprehensive legislation that protects DACA or undocumented students who seek higher education. Archive research and interviews with relevant parties: state government officials, interest group representatives, local community-based organization officials, etc.
NY, U.S. 42.65258-73.756233Nienhusser, H. Kenny. 2015. “Undocumented Immigrants and Higher Education Policy: The Policymaking Environment of New York State.” The Review of Higher Education 38 (2): 271–303. doi:10.1353/rhe.2015.0006.
State Legislation; Political Actors; Education Policy
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"Interior immigration enforcement: The impacts of expanding local law enforcement authority"LiteraturePolicy & Public ServicesThe 287g program allows local law enforcement to enforce immigration violations, which affected police-community relationship by increasing fear and distrust of law enforcement among immigrants. The 287g program has detrimental effects on the community, as evidenced by immigrant economic disruption and decreased immigrant civic engagement. Qualitative methods including participant observation, field research, face-to-face interviews with key informants, focus groups and archival research of public documentsAlamance, NC36.012045-79.425349Nguyen, Mai Thi, and Hannah Gill. 2015. “Interior Immigration Enforcement: The Impacts of Expanding Local Law Enforcement Authority.” Urban Studies 53 (2): 302–23. doi:10.1177/0042098014563029.
Law Enforcement; Public Opinion
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"Institutional Constraints Limiting Social Services for Immigrants"LiteraturePolicy & Public ServicesOrganizations remain significantly constrained due primarily to external coercive constraints. These constraints include restrictive state laws and increasing competition over limited funding.25 in-depth, semistructured interviews with social service personnel in UtahUT, U.S.40.760885-111.890886Browne, Shannon, Christy Glass, and Grant Holyoak. 2016. “Institutional Constraints Limiting Social Services for Immigrants.” Journal of Immigrant & Refugee Studies 14 (2): 156–76. doi:10.1080/15562948.2015.1066475.
Public Services; Budgeting; Governmental Agencies
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"From Sheriff's Deputies to Immigration Officers: Screening Immigrant Status in a Tennessee Jail"LiteraturePolicy & Public ServicesImmigration officers have different feelings about the immigrants they encounter, varying from pride to guilt. Rather than act as independent agents, immigration officers tend to act more as extensions of the federal government.
Interviews with deputized immigration officers and their supervisors, observations of meetings at the sheriff’s office, and news articlesNashville-Davidson, TN36.133814-86.821801Armenta, Amada. 2012. “From Sheriffs Deputies to Immigration Officers: Screening Immigrant Status in a Tennessee Jail.” Law & Policy 34 (2): 191–210. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9930.2011.00359.x.
Law Enforcement
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"Promoting Health and Wellness in Congregations Through Lay Health Educators: A Case Study of Two Churches"LiteraturePolicy & Public ServicesLay health educators of the churches played significant roles in health initiatives. Establishing a dependable and beneficial medical relationship with specific minority groups requires time and assistance from established, local organizations, such as religious institutions.Observational report of the health efforts of lay health educators at two religious institutions with a predominantly minority membership over the last 4 years Baltimore, MD
39.289891-76.61241Galiatsatos, Panagis, and W. Daniel Hale. 2015. “Promoting Health and Wellness in Congregations Through Lay Health Educators: A Case Study of Two Churches.” Journal of Religion and Health 55 (1): 288–95. doi:10.1007/s10943-015-0069-7.
Church; Public Health
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"Strengthening social capital through bilingual competence in a transnational migrant community: Mexicans in upstate New York"LiteratureCulture & LanguageBilingual competence is well within the reach of Mexican migrants. Expansion and modification of local language programs in English and Spanish can contribute to migrant's bilingual competence, increasing social capital, adaptation into their host community, and reintegration into their sending community.Semi-structured interviews; Participatory ObservationRiverdale, NY40.8941-73.911Grim-Feinberg, Kate. 2007. “Strengthening Social Capital through Bilingual Competence in a Transnational Migrant Community: Mexicans in Upstate New York.” International Migration 45 (1): 177–208. doi:10.1111/j.1468-2435.2007.00400.x.
Social Integration; Social Network; Language Programs; Bilingualism
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" Karen Resettlement: A Participatory Action Research Project "LiteratureCulture & LanguageKaren people resettle through social-networks from home and refugees camps, technology, religious organizations, and others. English language training, skill training, and other employment programs help Karen adults find valuable and appropriate jobs.Collaborative Research; Participatory ObservationGA, U.S. 32.1656-82.9001Gilhooly, Daniel, and C Allen Lynn. 2015. “Karen Resettlement: A Participatory Action Research Project.” Journal of International Migration and Integration 16 (3): 799–817. doi:10.1177/1476750315625338.
Refugee Resettlement; Community Building; Independent Integration
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" At The Core And In The Margins- Incorporation of Mexican Immigrants in 2 Rural Midwestern Communities "LiteratureCulture & LanguageVarious factors affect Latino immigrants' integration and local initiatives that support them such as churches services in Spanish and bilingual teaching. Immigrants' degree of legal incorporation is uneven; it varies from stages of conflict/ negotiation to full incorporation. This relationship is significant because legal incorporation determines immigrants' level of political inclusion, their type of employment, and general quality of life.Survey 260 immigrants and 47 in depth interviewsBeardstown, IL40.0175-90.4243Albarracin, Julia. 2016. “At The Core And In The Margins- Incorporation of Mexican Immigrants in 2 Rural Midwestern Communities.” Michigan State University Press. doi:10.14321/j.ctt19x3gvw.
Ethnic Relations; Rural Conditions; Cultural Assimilation; Integration Struggles
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" At The Core And In The Margins- Incorporation of Mexican Immigrants in 2 Rural Midwestern Communities "LiteratureCulture & LanguageVarious factors affect Latino immigrants' integration and local initiatives that support them such as churches services in Spanish and bilingual teaching. Immigrants' degree of legal incorporation is uneven; it varies from stages of conflict/ negotiation to full incorporation. This relationship is significant because legal incorporation determines immigrants' level of political inclusion, their type of employment, and general quality of life.Survey 260 immigrants and 47 in depth interviewsMonmouth,IL40.9114-90.6474Albarracin, Julia. 2016. “At The Core And In The Margins- Incorporation of Mexican Immigrants in 2 Rural Midwestern Communities.” Michigan State University Press. doi:10.14321/j.ctt19x3gvw.
Ethnic Relations; Rural Conditions; Cultural Assimilation; Integration Struggles
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" Immigrant Integration Models in "Illegal" Communities: Postville Iowa's Shadow Context " LiteratureCulture & LanguageCommunities with substantial unauthorized immigrant populations rely on formal and informal incorporation mechanisms to cultivate "welcoming" communities, however, these communities create a shadow context that perpetuate vulnerability and risk for unauthorized immigrants. Formal strategies utiliize "diversity champions" to foster an inclusive environment, but fail to remedy structural problems that put unauthorized populations at risk. Informal strategies rely on unsaid rules of community behavior that sustains structural exploitation in rural towns. Surveys and Interviews.Postville, IA43.0847-91.5682Sandoval, Gerardo Francisco. 2015. “Immigrant Integration Models in ‘Illegal’ Communities: Postville Iowas Shadow Context.” Local Environment 20 (6): 683–705. doi:10.1080/13549839.2014.963839.
Community Development; Rural Planning; Employers; Social Network
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"Long-Term Refugee Health: Health Behaviors and Outcomes of Cambodian Refugee and Immigrant Women"LiteratureHealthThe interrelated complex of characteristics, health behaviors, and health outcomes warrants a versatile approach to health education and promotion for long-term refugee health. Among Cambodian refugee women aged 35 to 60 years living in Lowell, MA, lower education and higher acculturation and age is associated with higher weight, higher acculturation and age is related to walking more often, and being divorced/ separated/ widowed and being older is related to higher risk of depression.Multivariate regression model for predictors of physical activity.Lowell, MA42.633427-71.31617Nelson-Peterman, Jerusha L., Robin Toof, Sidney L. Liang, and Dorcas C. Grigg-Saito. 2015. “Long-Term Refugee Health.” Health Education & Behavior 42 (6): 814–23. doi:10.1177/1090198115590779.Acculturation; Depression; Physical Activity; Refugees; Weight
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"Prevalence and Predictors of Food Insecurity in Migrant Farmworkers in Georgia"LiteratureHealthH-2A migrant and seasonal farmworkers are less susceptible to food insecurity than non-H-2A workers. There is a corresponding need to expand H-2A programs to provide benefits such as job security, higher wages, and access to cooking facilities, meals, and transportation that helps promote food security.Multivariate logistic regressionBainbridge, GA; Lowndes and Echols Counties, GA30.905149-84.575577Hill, Brittany G., Ashley G. Moloney, Terry Mize, Tom Himelick, and Jodie L. Guest. 2011. “Prevalence and Predictors of Food Insecurity in Migrant Farmworkers in Georgia.” American Journal of Public Health 101 (5): 831–33. doi:10.2105/ajph.2010.199703.
Food Insecurity, H-2A Program Workers; Immigration Reform and Control Act
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"Needs and Perceptions of Cooperative Extension Educators Serving Latino Populations in the South"LiteratureCulture & LanguageExtension programs from 12 southern states share integration initiatives to build partnerships and provide bilingual services for rural Latino immigrant communities. There is a need in these rural communities for Extension educators to learn more about the Latino culture and the language so they can be the bridge that connects Extension and local Latino communities. Survey of 982 Extension educators from 12 southern states; Multivariate Analysis of Variance Raleigh, NC35.7847-78.6821Herndon, Molly C., Andrew O. Behnke, Maria Navarro, Jenna B. Daniel, Julia Storm. 2013. "Needs and Perceptions of Cooperative Extension Educators Serving Latino Populations in the South." Journal of Extension 51 (1). Spanish-speaking; Cultural Awareness; Cultural Competence; Integration
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"Childcare, Language-use, and Vocabulary of Second-generation Latino Immigrant Children Growing Up in a New Immigrant Enclave in the United States"LiteratureEducationImproving access to childcare for communities with high proportions of second-generation immigrant children is important for language abilities. Latino children whose families have limited community and institutional support negatively effects their English and Spanish vocabulary scores. Comparative quantitative study measuring different forms of childcare's affect on children's language abilitiesSouth Atlantic Region, U.S.34.624237-79.004143Palacios, Natalia, Amanda K. Kibler, Ashley Simpson Baird. 2017. "Childcare, Language-Use, and Vocabulary of Second-Generation Latino Immigrant Children Growing up in a New Immigrant Enclave in the United States." Early Child Development and Care 187 (3): 690–706. doi:10.1080/03004430.2016.1223074 Child Care; Second Language Learning; Vocabulary Development; Hispanic Americans; Literacy; Language Acquisition
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"Building Teacher Interculturality: Student Partnerships in University Classrooms"LiteratureEducation
Teachers educated on intercultural understanding better serve their students. Preparation for teachers who work with English learners should include knowledge, skills, and experience of their students linguistic and cultural backgrounds.
Qualitative analysis of teacher's writing on intercultural understanding before and after programPA, U.S.40.965027-76.883484Smolcic, Elizabeth, and Jessica Arends. 2017. "Building Teacher Interculturality: Student Partnerships in University Classrooms." Teacher Education Quarterly 44 (4): 51–73. Higher Education; Competency Based Education; Undocumented Immigrants; Training Methods; Program Effectiveness
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"Policy, Context and Schooling: The Education of English Learners in Rural New Destinations" LiteratureEducationAssimilative policies in educational settings harm English Learners students learning in rural communities. Edcuational policy implementation is influenced by the local context understanding of EL students.Interviews with EL educators in five different rural Wisconsin countiesWI, U.S.43.7844-88.7879Lee, Stacey J., and Margaret R. Hawkins. 2015. "Policy, Context and Schooling: The Education of English Learners in Rural New Destinations." Global Education Review 2 (4): 40–59. Education; English Learners; Educational Policy; Anthropology; Rural Education
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"Placing Photovoice: Participatory Action Research with Undocumented Migrant Youth in the Hudson Valley"LiteratureEducationEncouraging migrant youth to tell their stories through photography benefits the community. The program combines Youth Participatory Action Research with Photovoice (a qualitative method for community cased participatory research and reality) to understand the experiences of of migrant youth living in rural areas and how they envision their futures. Participatory research with migrant youth through photography Hudson Valley, NY41.9209-73.9613Del Vecchio, Deanna, Nisha Toomey, and Eve Tuck. 2017. "Placing Photovoice: Participatory Action Research with Undocumented Migrant Youth in the Hudson Valley." Critical Questions in Education 8 (4): 358–376 Undocumented Youth; DACA; Youth Participatory Action Research; Image-Based Research; Participatory Photography
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"A Transformative Mixed Methods Assessment of Educational Access and Opportunity for Undocumented College Students in the Southeastern United States"LiteratureEducationSocial barriers prevent universities from implementing actionable ideas for undocumented students' inclusion. Transformative mixed methods are important tools for understanding the oppression of marginalized students groups in institutionalized settings. Both qualitative and quantitative methods based on several case studiesSoutheastern U.S.35.8486-86.3649Barnhardt, Cassie L., Kimberly Reyes, Angela Vidal Rodriguez, and Marisol Ramos. 2016. "A Transformative Mixed Methods Assessment of Educational Access and Opportunity for Undocumented College Students in the Southeastern United States." Journal of Mixed Methods Research p. 1-24. doi:10.1177/1558689816652764 Transformative Mixed Methods; Undocumented Students; Organizational Analysis
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"Social Support, Health, and Health Care Access among Latino Immigrant Men in an Emerging Community"
LiteratureHealthHigh social support is associated with less binge drinking, lower depression, and visiting the dentist on a regular basis, but not with other health care access measures (e.g. having health insurance, having a regular source of care, visiting the doctor regularly). This study's generalizability is limited to the measured sample of Latino immigrant men, since its sample estimates were not intended to broadly represent the population. Longitudinal research is necessary to prove causality, since this cross-sectional study could only observe associations.Cross-sectional baseline data (90 question baseline questionnaire administered in Spanish) of 140 men (137 of Latino descent) in Allegheny Country, Pennsylvania was analyzed using multivariate logistic regression.Allegheny County, PA40.45972-79.976041Documet, Patricia Isabel, Mark M. Troyer, and Laura Macia. 2018. “Social Support, Health, and Health Care Access Among Latino Immigrant Men in an Emerging Community.” Health Education & Behavior 46 (1): 137–45. doi:10.1177/1090198118763870.
community health; community-based participatory research; health disparities; immigration health; Latino; mental health
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"'Le tengo fe'" How do women's networks influence the health competence of Latina immigrant mothers living in a rural Midwestern state?"LiteratureHealthRural immigrant Latina mothers use traditional and biomedical approaches to acquire health competence in an environment that restricts their access to formal health care.Purposive sample from a multi-state study that assess the physical and mental health of ethnically diverse rural families with low incomes and young children; focus group and in-depth interviews conducted with eight Latina mothersAmes, IA42.02623-93.64859Romero de Slowing, Flor de Maria. 2012. “‘Le Tengo Fe’ How Do Womens Networks Influence the Health Competence of Latina Immigrant Mothers Living in a Rural Midwestern State?” ProQuest Dissertation Publishing, 1–128. doi:10.31274/etd-180810-1539.
health competence; Latina mothers; community capitals; local and transnational networks; health care access
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"Legal and Policy Challenges as Latinas/os Make Their Homes in MissouriLiteraturePolicy & Public ServicesEconomic change within MO that have drawn new immigrants to the state; demographic profile of MO's Latinos/as; policy challenges in education, health, and housing; civil rights issues for Latinas/os; policy recommendations for MO legislature/executive branch to ensure integration of Latinos/as into local MO communities and full participation of economic and social growth of the stateMO, U.S.37.964252-91.831833Lazos Vargas, Sylvia R. 2002. “Legal and Policy Challenges as Latinas/os Make Their Homes in Missouri.” Cambio De Colores 1 (1): 19–44. http://extension.missouri.edu/explorepdf/commdm/dm7615.pdf
legal; policy; civil rights
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"Social Factors Impacting Health in Southwest Missouri’s Immigrant Latino Population"LiteratureHealthHealth - abstract: A presentation focusing on the influence of social factors on "emotional health, health-seeking behavior and respondents’ perceptions of their physical health" of Latino households in four primarily rural counties in Southwest Missouri. Jackson County, MO39.90872-94.93204Walker, Suzanne E., Susan Dollar, and Ravindra G. Amonker. "Population Characteristics and Health Service Use by Latino Immigrants to Southwest Missouri." Great Plains Research 17, no. 1 (2007): 87-100. http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/greatplainsresearch/868.emotional health; physical health
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"Understanding Latinos' Economic Livelihoods, Civil Rights and Opportunities in Missouri to Inform Policies to Achieve Well-Being"LiteratureChange & IntegrationChange and Well-being - abstract: a study examines the association between citizenship status and context of reception, such as racial profiling and education, with level of income in stay-in-building communities in rural Missouri. Barry, Lawrence, McDonald, and Newton Counties, MO37.03165-93.98742Dozi, Pedro, and Corinne Valdivia. 2005. “Vulnerabilities and Economic Well-Being of Hispanic in Non-Metro Missouri.” American Agricultural Economics Association Annual Meeting, 1–30. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/DoziValdivia137044.pdf.
citizenship; context of reception
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"Fostering Change for Immigrant Latinos Through Radio Communications: The Case of a Central Missouri Community"LiteratureChange & IntegrationSelected Papers: A study examining the use of Spanish radio programming and its positive impacts in "a central Missouri community". MO, U.S.37.964252-91.831833Crank, Laura. 2005. “Fostering Change for Immigrant Latinos Through Radio Communications: The Case of a Central Missouri Community.” Cambio De Colores, 38–44. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/ProceedingsCambioDeColores2005Web.pdf.
Spanish radio programming; communication
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"The Nature and Extent of Latino Immigrants' Communication with Their Children About Sexual Issues"LiteratureEducationSelected Papers: A study investigating the role Latino adults intend to play in their children's sex education. Central MO, U.S.38.547159-92.667195Dannerbeck, Anne, Marjorie Sable, James D. Campbell, Eleanor Gonzalez, and Roxana Huaman. 2005. “The Nature and Extent of Latino Immigrants' Communication with Their Children About Sexual Issues.” Cambio De Colores, 45–55. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/ProceedingsCambioDeColores2005Web.pdf.
Parenting; sex education
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"Comprehensive Family Support System: The ParentLink Model"LiteratureYouth EngagementYouth, Families, and Community abstract- ParentLink as a method based on system theory and the ecology of human development.MO, U.S.37.964252-91.831833Mertensmeyer, Carol, and Mark Fine. 2004. “ParentLink: A Model of Integration and Support for Parents*.” Family Relations 49 (3): 257–65. doi:10.1111/j.1741-3729.2000.00257.x.
ParentLink; human development
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"Building Community Capacity to Address Health Disparity Issues in the Rural Hispanic Midwest: A Community Based Participatory Action Research Approach"LiteratureHealthHealth abstract- addresses barriers to health care access and approaches to overcome these challenges in rural Hispanic communities in Illinois.Rockford, IL42.2668-89.088379Cristancho, Sergio, D. Marcela Garces, Karen E. Peters, and Benjamin C. Mueller. 2008. “Listening to Rural Hispanic Immigrants in the Midwest: A Community-Based Participatory Assessment of Major Barriers to Health Care Access and Use.” Qualitative Health Research 18 (5): 633–46. doi:10.1177/1049732308316669.health care access barriers
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"A Comparative Study of the Life of Immigrant Women in Rural Illinois and in the North of Mexico"LiteratureChange & IntegrationChange and Integration - abstract: The paper compares rural Mexican domestic migrants and Mexican international migrants. The paper argues that domestic, or internal, migrants do not adapt better to their new place in comparison to external migrants.Champaign, IL40.116329-88.243523Raffaelli, Marcela, Steve P. Tran, Angela R. Wiley, Maria Galarza-Heras, and Vanja Lazarevic. 2012. “Risk and Resilience in Rural Communities: The Experiences of Immigrant Latina Mothers.” Family Relations 61 (4): 559–70. doi:10.1111/j.1741-3729.2012.00717.x.
migrants; domestic; international
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"Factors Affecting the Job Satisfaction of Latino/a Immigrants in the Midwest"LiteratureChange & IntegrationChange and Integration - abstract: The study of Latino/a immigrants in three rural communities in the Midwest found that "ethnic identity and Anglo acculturation had a positive effect, while perceptions of the community related to discrimination/ racism had a negative effect on job satisfaction." Champaign, IL40.116329-88.243523Valdivia, Corinne, and Lisa Y. Flores. “Factors Affecting the Job Satisfaction of Latino/a Immigrants in the Midwest.” Journal of Career Development 39, no. 1 (February 2012): 31–49. doi:10.1177/0894845310386478.ethnic identity; Anglo acculturation; job satisfaction
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"Moving Around to Get By and Try to Get Ahead: Immigration Experiences in New Settlement Communities of the Midwest"LiteratureChange & IntegrationChange and Integration - abstract: Mobility of the foreign-born has a negative impact on income, especially for females. MO, U.S.37.964252-91.831833Valdivia, Corinne, and Anne Dannerbeck Janku. 2009. “Moving Around to Get By and Try to Get Ahead: Immigration Experiences in New Settlement Communities of the Midwest.” Professional Development: The International Journal of Continuing Social Work Education 12 (3): 29–41. http://www.cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2009ValdiviaDannerbeck-Abstract.pdf.
foreign-born mobility; income
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"Experiences of Latino/a High School Students in the Rural Midwest"LiteratureEducationEducation - abstract: Research that discusses preliminary results investigating high school Latino/a experiences. Columbia, MO38.951706-92.334068May, S. F., Flores, L. Y., Jeanetta, S., Saunders, L., Valdivia, C., Arévalo Avalos, M. R., & Martínez, D. (2015). Latina/o immigrant integration in the rural midwest: Host community resident and immigrant perspectives. Journal of Latina/o Psychology, 3(1), 23–39. doi:10.1037/lat0000029High school experiences
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"Rural Hispanic Women in Missouri: A Needs Assessment"LiteratureCulture & LanguageSelected papers: A study examining facilitators and barriers for Spanish-speaking Latina women aged 50-65 in two rural Missouri counties to access health care services. MO, U.S.37.964252-91.831833Libbus, Kay, Marjorie Sable and Patricia Kelley. "Rural Hispanic Women in Missouri: A Needs Assessment." In Cambio de Colores - Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Conference. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2010CambioDeColoresProceedingsFullBookWEB.pdf.Latina women; health care access
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"The Impact of Social Networks on Well-Being: Evidence from Latino Immigrants"LiteratureChange & IntegrationSelected papers: A paper assessing the effect of social networks on Latinos' well-being in non-urban Missouri.MO, U.S.37.964252-91.831833Pedro Dozi. "The Impact of Social Networks on Well-Being: Evidence from Latino Immigrants." In Cambio de Colores - Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Conference. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2010CambioDeColoresProceedingsFullBookWEB.pdf.social networks; well-being
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"The role of acculturation, context of reception and capitals in the economic integration of Latino newcomers to the Midwest in 2009"LiteratureCulture & LanguageSelected papers: A study measuring the influence that capitals, acculturation, and subjective measure of community climate have on Latino newcomers’ income earnings in three non-urban areas of Missouri.MO, U.S.37.964252-91.831833Valvida, Corinne and Pedro Dozi. "The role of acculturation, context of reception and capitals in the economic integration of Latino newcomers to the Midwest in 2009." In Cambio de Colores - Proceedings of the Ninth Annual Conference. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2010CambioDeColoresProceedingsFullBookWEB.pdf.capitals; acculturation; community climate; income earnings
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"Undocumented Latina Networks and Responses to Domestic Violence in a New Immigrant Gateway: Toward a Place-Specific Analysis"LiteratureChange & IntegrationChange and Integration abstract- explores the experiences of Latina women with domestic violence and how they are affected by broader structural factors, local institutional contexts, and dynamic and geographically-contingent social and cultural connections.Ames, IA42.02623-93.64859Reina, Angelica S., Marta María Maldonado, and Brenda J. Lohman. 2013. “Undocumented Latina Networks and Responses to Domestic Violence in a New Immigrant Gateway.” Violence Against Women 19 (12): 1472–97. doi:10.1177/1077801213517513.
domestic violence; social and cultural connections; Latina women
46
"What Mexican Immigrant Women Want in Cervical Cancer Education"LiteratureEducationEducation abstract- suggestions for multimedia approaches to cervical cancer education for Mexican immigrant women with low literacy.Kansas City, MO39.099728-94.578568Hunter, Jennifer, and Patricia Kelly. 2011. “What Mexican Women Want in Cervical Cancer Education.” Journal of Gynecologic Oncology Nursing 21 (2). https://go.galegroup.com/ps/anonymous?id=GALE|A327236222&sid=googleScholar&v=2.1&it=r&linkaccess=abs&issn=15369935&p=AONE&sw=w.
multimedia; cervical cancer education; low literacy; Mexican women
47
"Matachines in the Midwest: A Case Study of Gender, Religion, and Ethnicity"LiteratureHealthHealth abstract- examination of the changes of gender roles experienced by immigrant Mexicans in the rural Midwest.Columbia, MO38.951706-92.334068Christ, Stephen R. 2016. “Matachines in the Midwest: Religion and Identity in the American Heartland.” Qualitative Sociology Review 12 (2): 44–59. https://search.proquest.com/docview/1797888578?accountid=351.
gender roles; Mexican immigrants
48
"Latina/o Food industry Employees: Barriers, Facilitators, Motivators, Training Preferences, and Perceptions of Work"LiteratureHealthHealth abstract- focus group study that examines factors that impact work performance and adherence to food safety guidelines among Latinx food service workers.Columbia, MO38.951706-92.334068Kanagui-Muñoz, Marlen, Patton O. Garriott, Lisa Y. Flores, Seonghee Cho, and James Groves. 2011. “Latina/o Food Industry Employees’ Work Experiences.” Journal of Career Development 39 (1): 118–39. doi:10.1177/0894845311400412.
work performance; food safety guidelines; food service workers
49
"Rural Latino Immigrant Mothers' Perceptions of Local Food and Health"LiteratureHealthHealth abstract- paper that aims to discover how newcomers' food consumption and health change after immigrating to the U.S. by gathering data from interviews conducted with 60 Latino mothers in a Midwestern state who have at least one child age 12 or younger, and whose household income is at or below 185% of the federal poverty level.Ames, IA42.02623-93.64859Greder, Kimberly, Flor Romero De Slowing, and Kimberly Doudna. 2012. “Latina Immigrant Mothers: Negotiating New Food Environments to Preserve Cultural Food Practices and Healthy Child Eating.” Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal 41 (2): 145–60. doi:10.1111/fcsr.12004.
food consumption; low income Latina mothers
50
"Nutrition and Physical Activity in a Summer Migrant Classroom"LiteratureHealthHealth abstract- intervention study to stem childhood obesity among children of Latino migrant farmworkers (MFW) through implementation of a summer Migrant Education Program (MEP). Study was found to have positively affected the health of MFW students.MI, U.S.44.314842-85.602364Kilanowski, Jill F., and Li Lin. 2013. “Summer Migrant Students Learn Healthy Choices Through Videography.” The Journal of School Nursing 30 (4): 272–80. doi:10.1177/1059840513506999.childhood obesity; Latino migrant farmworkers; Migrant Education Program
51
"Stop Bullying Now! Campaign Pilot Evaluation: A Qualitative Assessment of its Usefulness and Cultural Appropriateness for Hispanic Populations"LiteratureHealthHealth abstract- evaluation of the effects of the "Stop Bullying Now!" campaign on the Hispanic population. Found that materials used by the campaign for use with Hispanic parents, however, the parents interviewed had low levels of knowledge of the definition of bullying, were unaware of the campaign's existence, and had never seen the materials created for the campaign.Clemson, SC34.688679-82.834877Saladin-Subero, Rosanna, and Katherine Hawkins. 2011. “Stop Bullying Now! Campaign Pilot Evaluation: A Qualitative Assessment of Its Usefulness and Cultural Appropriateness for Hispanic Populations.” Social Marketing Quarterly 17 (2): 2–18. doi:10.1080/15245004.2011.570860."Stop Bullying Now!" campaign; parental knowledge of bullying
52
"Involving Immigrant Latino Farmers in Local Food Systems: A Community Capitals Approach"LiteratureEconomySelected paper (entrepreneurship and economic development)- study of two projects that engage Latino immigrants in gardening. One project documents the creation and implementation of a farm incubator for both immigrant Latino farmers and native (Anglo) farmers, and the other focuses on a community garden revitalized by Latino immigrant involvement.Ames, IA42.02623-93.64859Emery, Mary, Diego Thompson, and Claudi M Prado-Meza. 2011. “Involving Immigrant Latino Farmers in Local Food Systems: A Community Capitals Approach.” Cambio De Colores 10 (1): 40–45.http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2011CambioDeColoresProceedingsBookWEB.pdfgardening; Latino immigrants; farm incubators; community garden
53
"Transnationalism and Housing and Health Risks of Rural Latino Immigrant Families"LiteratureHealthSelected paper (health)- study using in-depth interviews of low-income Mexican immigrant mothers to assess the extent to which housing and health issues of rural Latino immigrant families vary based on the level of transnationalism.Ames, IA42.02623-93.64859Greder, Kimberly, and Christine C Cook. 2011. “Transnationalism and Housing and Health Risks of Rural Latino Immigrant Families.” Cambio De Colores 10 (1): 52–58. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2011CambioDeColoresProceedingsBookWEB.pdf
low-income Mexican immigrant mothers; housing; transnationalism
54
"Porous Spheres: Direct Observation of Interethnic Interaction in a Small Midwestern Community"LiteratureChange & IntegrationSelected paper (change and integration)- study that relies on direct observation of people interacting in public areas in a small Midwestern community with a substantial Latino population.Columbia, MO38.951706-92.334068Kuchinski, Ann Marie. 2011. “Porous Spheres: Direct Observation of Interethnic Interaction in a Small Midwestern Community.” Cambio De Colores 10 (1): 58–61. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2011CambioDeColoresProceedingsBookWEB.pdf
interethnic interaction
55
"The Policy Dimensions of the Context of Reception for Immigrants (and Latinos) in the Midwest"LiteratureChange & IntegrationSelected paper (change and integration)- study of contexts of reception in Midwest states. Found that the Midwest is more inclined to be more integrative than exclusionary concerning context of reception, but still neutral regarding this context of reception as determined by state policy.Lansing, MI42.73362-84.553932Martinez, Ruben, Jennifer Tello Buntin, and William Escalante. 2011. “The Policy Dimensions of the Context of Reception for Immigrants (and Latinos) in the Midwest.” Cambio De Colores 10 (1): 61–66. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2011CambioDeColoresProceedingsBookWEB.pdf
contexts of reception; state policy
56
"Ethnic Differences on the Effect of Mother's Perception of Child's Physical Activity on Child's Weight Status: A Focus on Hispanic Children in the Midwest"LiteratureHealthSelected paper (health)- study of ethnic differences on the impact of parents' perceptions of their child's physical abilities on the child's actual and future physical activity, sports involvement levels, and the child's weight status. Lansing, MI42.73362-84.553932Santiago, Olga J, Ruben Martinez, and Joey C Eisenmann. 2011. “Ethnic Differences on the Effect of Mother's Perception of Child's Physical Activity on Child's Weight Status: A Focus on Hispanic Children in the Midwest.” Cambio De Colores 10 (1): 90–98. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2011CambioDeColoresProceedingsBookWEB.pdf
ethnic differences; parental perceptions; physical activity; children; weight status
57
"Collaborating 2 Succeed: Latino Student Success Depends on Us All"LiteratureEducationEducation: an introduction to the presenter's research regarding factors that influence Latino students' retention rate. The session also introduces Juntos, a long-term program providing mentoring, peer supporting, and workshops for Latino students. Raleigh, NC35.779591-78.638176Behnke, Andrew O., Aysha Bodenhamer, Taylor Mcdonald, and Mayra Robledo. 2019. “The Impact of the Juntos Program: A Qualitative Evaluation.” Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 41 (1): 63–84. doi:10.1177/0739986318820486.Latino student retention rate; Juntos
58
"Social Capital in Rural Southwest Kansas"LiteratureChange & IntegrationSelected Papers: The study measured community engagement between Latinos and Anglos in rural Southwest Kansas. Kearny County, KS37.996005-101.352336Bolton, Debra J. 2012. "Social Capital in Rural Southwest Kansas." Cambio de Colores: Latinos in the Heartland. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2012CambioDeColoresProcedingsBookWEB.pdfcommunity engagement; Latinos and Anglos
59
"Protection for Undocumented Children: Sexual Abuse Among Latino Children Living in the Heartland"LiteratureHealthSelected Papers: The paper is a literature review of childhood sexual abuse of Latinos in the Midwest. Cedar Rapids, IA41.97805-91.669861Dirks-Bihum, April. 2012. "Protection for Undocumented Children: Sexual Abuse Among Latino Children Living in the Heartland." Cambio de Colores: Latinos in the Heartland. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2012CambioDeColoresProcedingsBookWEB.pdfchildhood sexual abuse
60
"Latino Farmers and USDA Agents talk about Challenges to Access and Use of USDA Programs"LiteratureEconomySelected Papers: The paper interviewed Latino farmers, primarily immigrants for Mexico, in Southwest Missouri and University Extension and USDA agents. The paper argues for Extension to play the middle man between USDA and Latino farmers, since farmers struggle with language barriers and knowledge of resources potentially available to them and USDA agents lack an adequate count of Latino farmers and understanding of Latino cultural backgrounds. MO, US38.478889-92.497028Gonzales, Eleazar U., Stephen C. Jeanetta. 2012. "Latino Farmers and USDA Agents talk about Challenges to Access and Use of USDA Programs." Cambio de Colores: Latinos in the Heartland. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2012CambioDeColoresProcedingsBookWEB.pdfLatino farmers; Extension; language barriers
61
"Exploring the Meanings of Food and Agriculture for Latino Youth Through The Use of PhotoVoice in Three Iowa Cities"LiteratureEconomySelected Papers: The paper presents recommendations for future projects based on how Latino youth prioritized social capitals in terms of agriculture. Ottumwa, IA41.019138-92.410498Flora, Jan L., et al. 2012. "Exploring the Meanings of Food and Agriculture for Latino Youth Through The Use of PhotoVoice in Three Iowa Cities." Cambio de Colores: Latinos in the Heartland. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2012CambioDeColoresProcedingsBookWEB.pdfLatino youth; social capitals; agriculture
62
"Family Nutrition Education Program in Missouri"LiteratureHealthSelected Papers: The author argues for nutritional education programs that have the Latino population in mind because they are effective in creating healthier habits. MO, US38.45349-92.477711Gabel, Candace, Britt Rankin. 2012. "Family Nutrition Education Program in Missouri." Cambio de Colores: Latinos in the Heartland. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2012CambioDeColoresProcedingsBookWEB.pdfnutritional education programs
63
"Re-framing the Conversation on Diversity"LiteratureEducationSelected Papers: "Diversity Education Plan,"a program to increase cultural competency for Extension professionals. MO, US38.430799-92.41196Gudiño, Alejandra, Donna Mehrle and Candance Gabel. 2012. "Re-framing the Conversation on Diversity". In Cambio de Colores - Proceedings of the Eleventh Annual Conference. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2012CambioDeColoresProcedingsBookWEB.pdfcultural competency; Extension
64
"Developing Latino Entrepreneur Support Networks: The Wapello County Microloan"LiteratureEconomySelected Papers: The paper states the problem and offers solutions on how to improve Latino entrepreneurship in rural communities.Wapello County, IA41.032131-92.395248Hernández, Himar. "Developing Latino Entrepreneur Support Networks: The Wapello County
Microloan." Cambio de Colores: Latinos in the Heartland. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2012CambioDeColoresProcedingsBookWEB.pdf
Latino entrepreneurship
65
"A Qualitative Exploration of Latino Immigrant Integration in Rural Midwestern Communities"LiteratureChange & IntegrationChange and integration abstract- qualitative examination of the experience of Latina/o immigrants in rural Midwest settings. MO, US38.455167-92.619261May, Sarah F., Lisa Y. Flores, Stephen Jeanetta, Lindsey Saunders, Corinne Valdivia, Marvyn R. Arevalo Avalos, and Domingo Martinez. 2015. “Latina/o Immigrant Integration in the Rural Midwest: Host Community Resident and Immigrant Perspectives.” Journal of Latina/o Psychology 3 (1): 23–39. doi:10.1037/lat0000029.
qualitative; immigrant perspectives
66
"Measures of Subjective Well-being, Acculturation Strategies, Networks, and Perceptions of the Context of Reception of Latino and Latina Newcomers in Rural Communities of the Midwest"LiteratureChange & IntegrationChange and integration abstract- article that examines indicators of Latina/o immigrant acculturation which results in quantifiable outcomes such as earnings, well-being, and job satisfaction.Columbia, MO38.951706-92.334068Valdivia, Corinne, Stephen Jeanetta, Lisa Y Flores, Alejandro Morales, and Domingo Martinez. 2012. “Latino/a Wealth and Livelihood Strategies in Rural Midwestern Communities.” Choices: The Magazine of Food, Farm and Resource Issues 27 (1): 1–7.
acculturation; earnings; well-being; job satisfaction
67
"Human Side of Immigration"LiteraturePolicy & Public ServicesCivil rights and political participation abstract- study focused on the mental health issues of immigrant children who face separation from their parents. These children often developed coping mechanisms to deal with mental health distress such as isolation, avoidance, political advocacy, and family based coping mechanisms. Washtenaw County, MO42.242558-83.864914Delva, Jorge, Pilar Horner, Ramiro Martinez, Laura Sanders, William D Lopez, and John Doering-White. 2013. “Mental Health Problems of Children of Undocumented Parents in the United States: A Hidden Crisis.” Journal of Community Positive Practices 13 (3): 25–35. http://www.jppc.ro/reviste/JCPP Nr. 3 2013/articole/art02.pdf.
mental health; immigrant children; parent-child separation
68
"The Academic Adaptation of Children of Immigrants in New and Traditional Settlement States: The Role of Family, Schools, and Neighborhoods"LiteratureEducationEducation abstract- assessment of the impact of family, schools, and neighborhoods on the academic acclimation of immigrants' children in new and traditional immigrant states. Uses the Educational Longitudinal Study (ELS) from 2002 to quantify these impacts across settlement locations by analyzing math and reading test scores.Columbia, MO38.951706-92.334068Potochnick, Stephanie. 2014. “The Academic Adaptation of Children of Immigrants in New and Established Settlement States: The Role of Family, Schools, and Neighborhoods.” Population Research and Policy Review 33 (3): 335–64. doi:10.1007/s11113-013-9319-0.
academic acclimation; math and reading test scores
69
"Health, Well-being, and Social Connectedness of Rural Hispanic Populations"LiteratureHealthSelected paper (health)- in-depth, multilingual study of the Hispanic populations of Finney County and Kearny County in southwest Kansas. Seeks to uncover unmet health needs, evaluate general well-being, and identify different types of social connectedness that exist within these communities.Finney and Kearny Counties, KS37.996005-101.352336Bolton, Debra J. 2013. “Health, Well-Being, and Social Connectedness of Rural Hispanic Populations.” Cambio De Colores 12 (1): 28–34. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2013CambioDeColoresProcedingsFullBookWEB.pdfwell-being; social connectedness
70
"Examining the Health Literacy of Rural Latina Immigrant Mothers and Their Use of the Internet to Seek Health Information"LiteratureHealthSelected paper (health)- study that analyzes health literacy, Internet use to seek health information, and the relationship of Internet usage to seek health information with children's and mothers' health status among Latina immigrant mothers who reside in a rural area in the Midwest.Ames, IA42.02623-93.64859Greder, Kimberly, and Kimberly Doudna. 2013. “Examining the Health Literacy of Rural Latina Immigrant Mothers and Their Use of the Internet to Seek Health Information.” Cambio De Colores 12 (1): 54–60. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2013CambioDeColoresProcedingsFullBookWEB.pdfhealth literacy; Internet usage
71
"Meanings and Strategies for Good Health: The Perspectives of Latina Immigrant Mothers in Rural Iowa"LiteratureHealthSelected paper (health)- study that aims to understand how Latina immigrant mothers in rural Iowa define good health and to identify strategies they use to maintain or improve their health.Ames, IA42.02623-93.64859Reina, Angelica, Kimberly Greder, and Tania Lee. 2013. “Meanings and Strategies for Good Health: The Perspectives of Latina Immigrant Mothers in Rural Iowa.” Cambio De Colores 12 (1): 97–103. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2013CambioDeColoresProcedingsFullBookWEB.pdf
Latina immigrant mothers; good health strategies
72
"Pathways to Community Leadership in Rapidly Diversifying Communities: Preliminary Results"LiteratureChange & IntegrationSelected paper (change and integration)-study of leadership development among Latinos that argues it is essential for those who work in community leadership programs to understand personal leadership biographies and parthways to leadership in order to enhance cross-cultural collaboration and integrative leadership.Alder, Hawthorn, Ironwood, and Sumac, MN47.561611-93.703815Spanier, Tobias, Scott Chazdon, Ryan Allen, and Amanda Hane. 2013. “Pathways to Community Leadership in Rapidly Diversifying Communities: Preliminary Results.” Cambio De Colores 12 (1): 103–11. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2013CambioDeColoresProcedingsFullBookWEB.pdf
leadership development; cross-culural collaboration
73
"Discrimination in Small Town American: The Cases of Beardstown and Monmouth, IL"LiteratureChange & IntegrationChanging communities abstract- book manuscript concerning the incorporation of Mexican immigrants in two rural towns in Illinois: Beardstown and Monmouth. Finds that immigrants in Beardstown felt less accepted and more discriminated against than immigrants in Monmouth, but both immigrants in both towns experiencd widespread discrimination.Beardstown and Monmouth, IL40.015869-90.433258Albarracín Julia. 2016. At the Core and in the Margins: Incorporation of Mexican Immigrants in Two Rural Midwestern Communities. East Lansing: Michigan State University Press.
immigrant discrimination
74
"Mixed Methods Study: Healthy-Eating Decision-Making in Adolescent Children of Latino Migrant Farmworkers"LiteratureHealthHealth abstract- mixed methods study of healthy eating decision-making among early adolescent children of Latino migrant and seasonal agricultural workers. Lansing, MI42.73362-84.553932Kilanowski, Jill F. 2016. “Influences on Healthy-Eating Decision Making in Latino Adolescent Children of Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Workers.” Journal of Pediatric Health Care 30 (3): 224–30. doi:10.1016/j.pedhc.2015.07.004.
healthy eating decision making, migrant/ seasonal agricultural workers
75
"Improving the Health of Hispanic Families with an Extension Community-Based Curriculum "Abriendo Caminos""LiteratureHealthHealth abstract- program that aims to implement, adapt, and evaluate the effectiveness of a community workshop-based curriculum to prevent childhood obesity and advocate healthy nutrition and life-style habits among low income, low literacy Hispanic families in California, Connecticut, Illinois, Puerto Rico, and Texas.Champaign, IL40.116329-88.243523Teran-Garcia, Margarita, Angela Wiley, Bridget Hannon, and Elizabeth Villegas. 2017. “Clearing the Path to the Prevention of Childhood Obesity: How to Expedite the Track.” Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior 49 (7). doi:10.1016/j.jneb.2017.05.109.
childhood obesity; life-style/ nutrition habits; low income; low literacy; families
76
"Multicultural Needs Assessment of Extension Educators- Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service"LiteratureEducationSelected paper (education)- study conducted by Oklahome Cooperative Extension Service and Oklahoma State University's College of Human Sciences' multicultural and community engagement program to determine the needs for intercultural training by Extension personnel across the state of Oklahoma.Stillwater, OK36.115608-97.058365Fabregas Janeiro, Maria G., Joyce Martin, and Jorge H. Atiles. 2015. “Multicultural Needs Assessment of Extension Educators - Oklahoma Cooperative Extension Service.” Cambio De Colores 14 (1): 37–41.
intercultural training; Extension
77
"The Dual Language Education Program of Delavan-Darien School District: A Case of Latino Community Leadership"LiteratureEducationSelected paper (dual language)- case study of a dual language education program in the Delavan-Darien School District in Wisconsin. The program served 160 participants during its installation period in the 2014-2015 school year.Delavan-Darien, WI42.630936-88.66145Inzunza, Jorge, Berenice Solis, and Cynthia Bell-Jimenez. 2015. “The Dual Language Education Program of Delavan-Darien School District: A Case of Latino Community Leadership.” Cambio De Colores 14 (1): 47–50.
dual language education
78
"Educational Language Policy and the New Latino Diaspora in Iowa"LiteratureEducationSelected paper (ELL)- study that finds both policymakers and educators have struggled to formulate coherent plans to accommodate native Spanish speakers and leverage resources to enact existing plans for English Learners in Iowa.Iowa City, IA41.66124-91.530128Cassels Johnson, David, Stephanie Lynch, and Crissa Stephens. 2015. “Educational Language Policy and the New Latino Diaspora in Iowa.” Cambio De Colores 14 (1): 55–59.
English Learners; New Latino Diaspora
79
"Relationship Between Health Insurance Status of Latino children and Their Overall and Dental Health"LiteratureHealthSelected paper (health)- study that finds rural Latino children who are covered by private health insurace experience better overall health than rural Latino children who are insured through Medicaid.Ames, IA42.02623-93.64859Rodriguez, Griselda, and Kimberly Greder. 2015. “Relationship Between Health Insurance Status of Latino Children and Their Overall and Dental Health.” Cambio De Colores 14 (1): 66–68. http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2016proceedings.pdf
Medicaid; private health insurace
80
"Diabetes Education by Phone to Hispanic Populations Using an Automated Call Center"LiteratureHealthHealth - abstract: A presentation describing a diabetes education call center that delivers educational messages by phone to diabetics at desired intervals and times. Cooper County, MO38.84526-92.824958Leo, Gianluca De, Santosh Krishna, Sue Boren, Marco Fato, Ivan Porro, and E. Andrew Balas. 2005. “Web and Computer Telephone-Based Diabetes Education: Lessons Learnt from the Development and Use of a Call Center.” Journal of Medical Systems 29 (4): 343–55. doi:10.1007/s10916-005-5894-x.diabetes education call center
81
Southeast Missouri Health NetworkRFAChange & IntegrationSenath, MO36.134235-90.159821https://www.semohealthnetwork.org/http://extension.missouri.edu/explorepdf/commdm/dm7615.pdfActive
82
Pettis County Community PartnershipRFAChange & IntegrationSedalia, MO38.704529-93.236542https://www.facebook.com/pettiscommunitypartners/http://extension.missouri.edu/explorepdf/commdm/dm7615.pdfActive
83
Bridging the GapRFAHealthKansas City, MO39.099728-94.578568https://www.jvskc.org/bridging-the-gap-2019-2020/http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/ProceedingsCambioDeColores2005Web.pdfActive
84
Binational Health WeekRFAHealthKansas City, MO39.099728-94.578568binationalhealthweek.orghttp://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/ProceedingsCambioDeColores2005Web.pdfActive
85
Community Partners for Parkinson CareRFAHealthSpringfield, MO37.208958-93.292297https://www.facebook.com/ParkinsonsGroup/http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/ProceedingsCambioDeColores2005Web.pdfActive
86
Alliance for Economic InclusionRFAChange & IntegrationKansas City, MO39.099728-94.578568https://www.fdic.gov/consumers/community/aei/regional/kansas.htmlhttp://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2006-08CambioDeColoresAbstractsBookWEB.pdfActive
87
ParentLinkRFAYouth EngagementColumbia, MO38.951706-92.334068https://education.missouri.edu/parentlink/http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2006-08CambioDeColoresAbstractsBookWEB.pdfActive
88
Medline PlusRFAHealthBoone County, MO37.494591-91.93309https://www.como.gov/health/links/http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2006-08CambioDeColoresAbstractsBookWEB.pdfActive
89
United Migrant Opportunity ServicesRFAChange & IntegrationMO, U.S.37.964252-91.831833https://www.umos.org/http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2006-08CambioDeColoresAbstractsBookWEB.pdfActive
90
SuccessRFAEducationStockton, CA37.957703-121.290779https://www.pacific.edu/successhttp://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2010CambioDeColoresProceedingsFullBookWEB.pdfActive
91
Exito en el NorteRFAChange & IntegrationAmes, IA42.026798-93.620178http://www.exitovideos.com/http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2011CambioDeColoresProceedingsBookWEB.pdfActive
92
JuntosRFAEducationWatauga and Sampson counties, NC36.13124-81.67139https://juntos.dasa.ncsu.edu/about/http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2012CambioDeColoresProcedingsBookWEB.pdfActive
93
ELL BinderRFAChange & IntegrationWarren County, MO38.8233-91.14046http://www.warrentonhighschool.warrencor3.org/UserFiles/Servers/Server_642598/File/WHS%2015-16%20%20Student%20handbook.pdfhttp://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2013CambioDeColoresProcedingsFullBookWEB.pdfActive
94
Expanded Food and Nutritional Education ProgramRFAChange & IntegrationGarden City, KS37.974979-100.85865https://www.southwest.k-state.edu/program_areas/family_consumer_sciences/efnep/http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2013CambioDeColoresProcedingsFullBookWEB.pdfActive
95
Latino Entrepreneurship TrainingRFAEconomyFayetteville, AR36.082157-94.171852https://www.joe.org/joe/2014february/pdf/JOE_v52_1tt4.pdfhttp://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2013CambioDeColoresProcedingsFullBookWEB.pdfUnknown
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Migrant Farmers Assistance FundRFAChange & IntegrationLafayette County, MO39.05024-93.534019http://www.migrantfarmworkersaf.org/http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2016proceedings.pdfActive
97
Latino Economic Development CenterRFAEconomyMN, U.S.46.729553-94.685898https://ledc-mn.org/index.php/en/home/http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2016proceedings.pdfActive
98
Morris Intercultural Education InitiativeRFAChange & IntegrationMorris, MN45.586021-95.914032https://students.morris.umn.edu/community-engagement/programs-available/morris-intercultural-education-initiativehttp://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2016proceedings.pdfActive
99
Dual Language Education ProgramRFACulture & LanguageDelavan-Darien, WI42.67003-88.8186http://ddschools.ss4.sharpschool.com/whats_cool/DLEhttp://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2016proceedings.pdfActive
100
"CASA Sioux County and CASA Sioux County 100"RFAChange & IntegrationSioux County, IA43.090348-96.195326https://casasiouxcounty.org/http://cambio.missouri.edu/Library/Publications/2012CambioDeColoresProcedingsBookWEB.pdfActive

Academic Resources

Good Ideas from Published Research

Brief: Effective Intervention for Traumatized Refugee Children
  • Schools can facilitate early intervention for traumatized refugee children.
  • Trauma-related behavioral training programs help teachers recognize symptoms of traumatization.
  • Combinations of cognitive-behavioral therapies (CBT) involving parents, teachers, and community aid rehabilitation.

Read more…

Foundations: Immigration, Crime, and Local Policing

In the early twentieth century, experts equated increased immigration with increased crime and “societal disorganization” (1). The real relationship between immigration and crime is far more complicated and nuanced than those experts believed. Contemporary scholars agree that no direct causal link exists between increased immigration and increased crime in major U.S. cities (1;2;3;4;5). In fact, some research finds that an influx of immigrants can actually decrease crime in many communities. Read more…

Brief: Access to Healthcare for Undocumented Immigrants
  • Undocumented immigrants will comprise 25% of America’s uninsured over the next decade (1).
  • Undocumented immigrants are 21% less likely than documented immigrants to have reliable healthcare (2).
  • Undocumented immigrants often receive health care services from “safety-net providers.” (3)

Read more…

Call for Research: Multilingual Policing in Immigrant Communities
  • Preconceived notions create police-immigrant tensions in communities with large immigrant populations (2;3).
  • Immigrant communities more acutely feel the problems related to degraded police-community relations (3).
  • Increasing police officers’ multicultural understanding and multilingual skills can decrease misunderstandings in confrontations between immigrant communities and the judicial system (1;2;5).

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Brief: Academic Mentorship and Immigrant Latino Students
  • Latino immigrant students are less likely to join academic extracurricular activities compared to natives or other immigrant populations (1).
  • Mentoring programs after school encourages Latino immigrant students to pursue higher education (2;3).
  • Latino Youth dropout rates can be mitigated by mentoring and adult supervision (2).

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Foundations: History of Immigration to Rural America

Americans often describe themselves as belonging to “a nation of immigrants,” drawing on shared histories and family stories of immigration. Early waves of European immigrants settled rural areas over two centuries of US expansion, while non-Europeans were marginalized (1;2). Beginning with the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1884, and culminating in the 1924 National Origins Act, the federal government explicitly forbade immigration from Asia and severely limited non-European entries. After the end of the national quota system and the 1965 Immigration and Naturalization Act, a new mass wave of immigration began, bringing people different from longer-term residents in language, ethnicity, race, and religion. Read more…